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ETHICS IN POLICING

  

The need for ethical officers is paramount to maintaining public trust. The officer’s peers, as well as the public in which they serve, attitude towards him is reflected by his reputation. Police research has shown that departments with an abundance of unethical officers constantly face heavy scrutiny by the public and local government. Throughout the nation, the news continues to report allegations of police profiling, guilty pleas/verdicts of officers taking bribes and arrest for public corruption. In 2014, this resulted in record public unrest and violence between police and citizens. Ethics in Policing is designed to educate the officer of the moral principles that govern the profession and the standards by which the profession must operate under to maintain the public’s trust. The course will define moral character and review excessive use of force, sexual harassment, stalking, misuse of authority, unprofessional relationships, making false statements, unlawful use of controlled substances, acts of improper communications, fraud, tampering with evidence, illegal arrest, and divulging confidential information. It also explores police culture and challenges officers to be more accountable for their actions. (8-hour course is approved by the Mississippi Law Enforcement Board of Standards and Training) 

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LEADERSHIP 101

  

Research published by the U.S. Department of Justice revealed that style or quality of field supervision can significantly influence patrol officer behavior. Front Line Supervisors are arguably the most important personnel in a police organization. These individuals are the bridge between command staff and the patrol division. The Justice Report also showed that frontline supervision by sergeants and lieutenants can influence some patrol officer behavior, but the study found that this influence varies according to the style of supervision. An “active” supervisory style which involved leading by example seemed to be the most influential. This course will explore 6 leadership styles (Authoritarian, Paternalistic, Democratic, Laissez-faire, Traditional and Transformational and the 4 supervisory styles (Traditional, Innovative, Supportive and Active). It will also teach communication techniques to equip officers with the necessary tools, words, and phrases to create positive outcomes for officers and citizens (8-hour course is approved by the Mississippi Law Enforcement Board of Standards and Training)

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OFFICER RESPONSE TO STRESS

Police officers, Firefighters, EMT’s and other first-responders regularly experience stress and trauma.  Most experience Complex Trauma, which is caused by the repeated exposure to violence or the result of seeing violent events over a period of time.  If left untreated, firstresponders are susceptible to possible mental issues and physical illnesses.  This course is designed to educate the responder of the causes  of complex trauma, how the brain responds to stress and trauma, methods  that can be used to manage exposure to trauma, and how to cope with occupational stress in their work environments.           

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POLICE IMPLICIT BIAS

Recently, the law enforcement community has faced scrutiny for its treatment of the public which whom they are sworn to protect and serve. The media has continued to focus on issues such as race relations and the use of force. These incidents and issues have caused the public to lose trust in law enforcement.  Although race-related issues are primarily the topics of the news stories, there are many more challenges that the police and community face due to preconceived biases and a lack of understanding of the differences that make us unique.  There is a critical need for a more professional community-based system of service delivery. It has also become evident that law enforcement officers are not receiving adequate training to address the changing needs of the profession. To become more professional and to meet the needs of our diverse communities, intensive implicit bias and human relations training is required for federal, state and local law enforcement officers. 

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NEW OFFICER COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

  

The need for a more understanding, creative and engaging police officer has never been more prevalent. Officers are constantly faced with issues within the communities in which they serve and called upon by citizens to solve these problems. The more engaging, charismatic and persuasive an officer is the more they are likely to receive community support and cooperation which assists in crime prevention and increased crime solvability percentages.

This course is designed to develop a more accountable officer who has a clear understanding of how ethics can negatively or positively affect the officer for the duration of their career. 

Course Objectives:

· Define police culture and its effects on the officer, the department and the community.

· Educate the officer on the fundamentals of ethical policing.

· Define a standard Code of Conduct for policing.

· Provide the officer with a complete understanding of integrity and why it is crucial to gain the public’s trust.

· Educate the officer on Procedural Justice and why it is important.

· Provide an understanding of Bias Policing and its effect on the community.

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INTRO TO MAJOR CRIME INVESTIGATIONS

  

The 21st century has ushered in a new set of crimes that departments are just beginning to investigate. The old try and true methods of investigating these crimes play a major part in the investigatory stages. Couple the new techniques such as electronic investigating with the older more physical techniques and an investigator will become a better departmental asset. Electronic crimes such as threats, fraud, telecommunications violations and wire transfers are very common. Images of criminals or crimes or the evidence of those crimes submitted by the perpetrator or acquaintance via Facebook, Twitter, Instagram etc. are also common. Officers and investigators need to know how to effectively communicate with and investigate these individuals. Interview techniques of suspects and informant development have also changed. This 8 hour course is designed to assist the officer with the necessary tools needed to effectively investigate and solve simple and complex crimes thoroughly and efficiently.

(8 Hour Course)

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UNDERSTANDING THE CHANGING WORLD OF NARCOTICS

The 21st Century has ushered in a new wave of illegal and legal narcotics.  Drug use and abuse has become front page news.  Recently, there has been a shift in the average narcotics trafficker profile.  Avid chemist, doctors and even house wives have been added to the multitude of traffickers, users and informants.  The common ways of Informant development and usage have also taken a drastic change.  This 8 hour training seeks to bridge the gap between police and narcotic trafficker and to shift the focus from common narcotics tactics to more useful and cerebral ways to dismantle organizations from the average street dealers to the above average trafficker in your city.

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HUMAN DIVERSITY AND POLICE RELATIONS

  

The purpose of this 40 hour course is to address the overall challenges law enforcement officer’s encounter with the community through instruction, dialogue, exercises and training. Recently, law enforcement practitioners have faced scrutiny of their treatment of the public which whom they are sworn to protect and serve. The media has continued to focus on issues such as race relations and the use of force. These incidents and issues have caused the public to begin to lose trust in law enforcement, which could cause more concerns with citizens complying with direct requests from law enforcement and even spikes in crime. Although race related issues are primarily the topics of the news stories, there are many more challenges that the police and community face. 

(This 40 hour course is approved by the Mississippi Law Enforcement Board of Standards and Training)

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UNDERSTANDING JUVENILE DEVIANCY: CREATING FEWER CRIMINALS

Cognitive Thinking is a skill and attribute that is developed at a very early age and nurtured by parents and peer groups.  Juvenile delinquents lack strong, if not any, cognitive thinking skills, most importantly decision making and judgment.  Our delinquent youth have been strongly affected by poor parenting and the media.  This 8 hour course seeks to eliminate officer prejudices and build officer understanding and enlightenment so that they may communicate better with youth and begin to foster better relationships, ideas and programs to help improve a juvenile’s judgment and decision making. 

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How To Manage a Department of Millennials

  

Executive Police Management is a delicate balancing act of satisfaction. One must satisfy the police officers, Mayor, local council, and general public. A Millennial is any person born between the years 1982 to the early 2000’sThe measure of a leader is what your people do when you are not around. This course seeks to effectively communicate to the executive that growth is primary. No one stops learning therefore executives should be equipped or reminded of ways to effectively communicate a goal or attitude that will be accomplished when they are not around. This course will stripe the barriers of experience and attitude from the executive in order to implant the latest techniques used to communicate with Millennials. A survey that was taken by Mr. Cloy at a prior department that he was employed found that officers rated training and equipment as the number 1 thing that they wanted from the department. 

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Street Level Tactical Team Development and Deployment

  

Police Departments across the country use Street Level Tactical Teams. These teams usually consist of the departments most productive and motivated officers. The problem is that these officers also have the most or a large number of citizen/suspect complaints. Today’s citizens are armed with camera phones and many civil unrests have been due to information recorded on these phones by citizens documenting and disseminating negative police behavior. A team’s tactical presence, movement and deployment is key, as it relates to crime suppression. This course seeks to assist in developing and educating tactical teams so that they may stay out of the camera lens with unnecessary and improper police conduct. (8-hour course is approved by the Mississippi Law Enforcement Board of Standards and Training)

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Campus Police Tactical Team Development and Deployment

  

Educational institutions should be a place of enrichment and higher education. Unfortunately, they have become large “soft targets” for some of our nation’s mass murders. Police departments across the country use Street Level Tactical Teams and also Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) units.  These teams usually consist of the departments’ most productive and motivated officers. Recently, there has been a drastic spike in college campus threats, suspect-to-victim shootings and active shooter events. Campus officers generally police college-age individuals who primarily commit minor offenses. These officers are also tasked with using deadly force, if needed, to defend students. Typically, campus police are not regularly trained in any type of tactical response for deadly threat situations, but in order to keep our students and faculty safe, colleges need to change protocol in order to deter this type of threat while preserving the integrity of the department. 

Today’s citizens are armed with camera phones, and a large number of civil unrest has been due to information recorded on these phones by bystanders documenting and disseminating negative police behavior. The question then becomes, “How do I take my best tactical officers and make them friendly?” A 2014 study by the FBI showed that recent mass shootings have lasted between 2 to 5 minutes. Local police usually cannot respond to a scene within this time, but campus police are already on scene and should be mentally and physically equipped to act instead of waiting for local police response. A team’s tactical presence, movement and deployment are crucial as it relates to deterrence and eliminating a threat possibly saving countless lives. With proper and re-enforced training, officers gain confidence in their skillset and are much more effective than officers with standard training, including local police. This course seeks to assist in developing, educating and training tactical teams so that they may perform their duties in a manner which is safe but citizen-friendly.

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Non-Physical Arrest Techniques

  

Officers routinely arrest individuals, some on a daily basis. Unfortunately, this routine becomes “routine” for officers which causes them to be less tactical. Some suspects who face potential arrest can become violent or even flee. This creates an inherent danger that is a part of policing. But, there are physical and verbal techniques that officers can use to lessen a suspects violent reaction or need to flee. Officers can also be aware of a suspect’s body language or verbiage clues that are displayed prior to an arrest.  

This course is designed to develop a more physically tactical and cerebral officer who will be able to lessen violent physical altercations and fleeing suspects through verbiage, body language and body placement. 

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Basic/Situational Report Writing

  

A major skill for a police officer is written communication. Documentation should be an officer’s secondary tool of offense and defense.  An officer will have to document almost every event that occurred during his tour of duty.  The ability to thoroughly translate a past event so that civilians and law enforcement can gather a clear and concise concept of what happened is not as common in law enforcement as it should.  There are constant situations where cases have been dismissed due to poor or no officer documentation.  Officers also need to understand the importance of court testimony from notes and written reports.  

This course is designed to develop an officer’s written communication confidence with spelling and grammar as well as offer sources of assistance when in doubt about written communication.  The course also offers template concepts, situational writing techniques and court testimony instruction and scenarios.

  

A major skill for a police officer is written communication. Documentation should be an officer’s secondary tool of offense and defense.  An officer will have to document almost every event that occurred during his tour of duty.  The ability to thoroughly translate a past event so that civilians and law enforcement can gather a clear and concise concept of what happened is not as common in law enforcement as it should.  There are constant situations where cases have been dismissed due to poor or no officer documentation.  Officers also need to understand the importance of court testimony from notes and written reports.  

This course is designed to develop an officer’s written communication confidence with spelling and grammar as well as offer sources of assistance when in doubt about written communication.  The course also offers template concepts, situational writing techniques and court testimony instruction and scenarios.

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Undercover Narcotics Ops

  

There are new challenges in the law enforcement community as it relates to the detection, interruption and dismantling of illegal narcotic traffickers at every level. From rouse traffic stops to deep undercover operations, patrol officers as well as investigators should be working collaboratively in targeting and dismantling drug trafficking organizations. 

This course is designed to provide training that meets the basic needs of both the patrol officer and the investigator. This course will instill confidence and knowledge in the beat officer and investigator, helping them to accomplish their goals of arresting and convicting traffickers that they target. This 16 hour course is approved by the MS Board of LEO Standards and Training for 16 hours CEU’s.

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